Updated: Man jumped into track (as opposed to being pushed down)

The disruption in train service this morning is confirmed to be due to someone falling onto the tracks at Choa Chu Kang MRT station. No details have been disclosed yet, but the media was once advised (can anyone confirm this?) not to sensationalize such incidents but instead just report the facts. It’s not known if this was a suicide, but by not sensationalizing the situation, copycat suicides can be prevented from happening where the suicide victim is usually in financial turmoil and compassionate people usually donate to the family after the death of the victim.

I hope the victim can rest in peace.

Man found dead on Choa Chu Kang MRT track

MORNING rush hour train services at Choa Chu Kang station were discrupted on Monday after a man was found dead on the MRT track.

Police received a call at 8 am that a man had fallen onto the track.

The man, a Chinese in his mid-40s, was pronounced dead at 8.30 am.

Police and Singapore Civil Defence Force personnel are at the scene, which has been cordoned off.

Commuters rushing to work were informed that there was no train service from Yew Tee to Bukit Gombak stations towards Jurong East.

If you have more details and photos, send them to sti@sph.com.

Updated:

MORNING rush hour train services at Choa Chu Kang station were disrupted on Monday after a man was found dead on the MRT track.

SMRT Corp said in a release on Monday that he was hit by a train at the station.

A shopkeeper in the station said he heard commuters saying that the man had jumped onto the track.

Police received a call at 8 am that a man had fallen onto the track, near the 5th exit from the rear.

The man, a Chinese in his mid-40s, was pronounced dead at 8.30 am.

The incident disrupted the morning peak hour train services between Yew Tee and Bukit Gombak stations, towards Jurong East.

Trains running on this line had to turn around.

SMRT sent a dozen buses to the station to bring the stranded commuters to the connecting stations shortly after 8 am.

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Normal train services resumed at about 8.50 am after the body of the man was removed from the track.

About 7,300 passengers travelling from Yew Tee to Bukit Gombak stations were affected during the incident.

Passengers who were unable to complete their journeys due to the disruption can claim a full fare refund from the Passenger Service Centre in any of the 51 SMRT stations within the next three working days.

Police are investigating.

Update #2:

TRAIN services at Choa Chu Kang station were disrupted for about an hour on Monday morning after a man fell onto the MRT track and was hit by a train pulling in on the North-bound track towards Jurong East.

SMRT said some 7,300 commuters travelling from Yew Tee to Bukit Gombak stations were affected by the disruption between 8am and 8.50am.

A shopkeeper in the station said he heard commuters saying that the man had jumped onto the track during the morning rush hour.

Police received a call at 8am that a man had fallen onto the track, near the 5th exit from the rear, and rushed a team from the Singapore Civil Defence Force to the scene.

The man, a Chinese in his mid-40s, was pinned under the third carriage of the train and was pronounced dead by paramedics at 8.30am.

The incident disrupted the morning peak hour train services between Yew Tee and Bukit Gombak stations, towards Jurong East.

Trains running on this line had to turn around.

SMRT quickly activated its bus bridging service and sent a dozen buses to the station to bring the stranded commuters to the connecting stations shortly after 8am.

Scores of other commuters rushing to work turned to taxis, sparking a long queue at the cab stand. Others called their families to pick them up, while many decided to walk to the next station to catch the train.

Normal train services resumed at about 8.50am after the body of the man was removed from the track.

An eyewitness, Mr Rommel, 41, a Filipino piping engineer, told The Straits Times that he was waiting on the platform when he heard a woman screaming.

‘I was shocked to see a man stuck under the train’s carriage. My throat went dry,’ said a shaken Mr Rommel.

He said two civilians helped to disperse the crowd near the platform.

Over at Yew Tee station, some 200 commuters were waiting for their train when the service was disrupted.

Passengers who were unable to complete their journeys due to the disruption can claim a full fare refund from the Passenger Service Centre in any of the 51 SMRT stations within the next three working days.

Police are investigating.

Article obtained from straitstimes.com on 7th April 2008



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